Is iPassive a Truly Passive Income Stream or a Scam?


For internet marketers, the ultimate dream is to making a living with passive income. As the name suggests, the income/cash flow is truly passive and comes to you no matter what, and requires little intervention.

iPassive is a newly launched product which claims to help you make money passively. Can it really help you earn some dough online or if it's a scam and something you should avoid? In this iPassive review, we share the things you need to know about this system.

iPassive Review - What Is It?

As soon as you visit the product's sales page, you will be greeted by a bold claim. It says you can generate 'insane passive income' with this brand-new loophole and that it works in any niche. It goes on to say the traffic is 100% free and you won't have to invest a dime.

The product is created by an internet marketer called Trevor Carr, and he claims his system is weird and evergreen. Just do the work once, and reap in rewards month after month on total autopilot. Similar programs which rely on excessive misleading statements hardly work and often turn out to be scams which one must avoid.

Not saying you cannot make a passive income, but there are no cash printing loopholes in existence. It takes in a lot of efforts, time and some luck to make a living online and make close to this daily:

Don't have high hopes from this system just yet, these results are anything but typical. There's absolutely no way you'll make this on a daily basis without an email list, following or a website. We have been in the internet marketing space since 2012 and have seen hundreds of programs come and go.

That's simply not true, and looks like it's just a desperate attempt to get sales. The sales letter mentions everything but has no mention of how Trevor's 'weird' loophole actually works. It goes on to share a story of a mentor and a student, their copy-paste get rich quick formula and tons of income screenshots, but you won't find a hint about what you'll actually learn in the training.

The Video Training

There's no mention of what you'll be learning but the website does share what you'll get as a member. You will get instant access to 20 over the shoulder training videos in the members area and access to a private 'VIP' Facebook group. The product creator claims the process is laid out in a step-by-step manner and is newbie-friendly. In his words, you can follow the same path his student did (and make a fortune).

They also supposedly share a few 'cash machines' so you won't have to do any of the work. It sounds funny if you think about it for a minute with an open mind. Why would you expect rewards for work you didn't do? It's only you and your actions which determine how your future will loo like. Money just can't grow on a tree out of nowhere.

The training program does come with a 30-day money back guarantee but we don't see a reason why someone will purchase it. If there isn't anything substantial worth with what you'll be learning, we can bet you won't drop a dime on it.

Is iPassive a Scam?

No, iPassive cannot be called a scam because we couldn't find enough evidence against the product. It costs $12 and probably teaches the basics of affiliate marketing since it talks about getting sales and making commissions. However, it's definitely not something which we'll be happy to recommend to our readers. You're better off saving your money here.

There are far better programs for learning affiliate marketing if that's something of your interest. Our top recommended training teaches just that and has helped hundreds of people create a realistic 5-figure monthly revenue. Definitely give it a go if you're interested in working from home and want to make a living working online.

The training works, but it does require some work and commitment from your end like a real business. Put in the work and you'll reap the rewards, there's no other way!

Last Updated:

iPassive

$13
4

Ease of Use

7.0/10

Quality

2.0/10

Value for Money

3.0/10

Pros

  • Inexpensive
  • Teaches the basics

Cons

  • Training is mediocre at best, not result-oriented. There are far better options available.
  • Makes some bold income claims, results anything but typical.

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